Month: May 2019


Liam Pope applying gloss top coat to cab side sheets in reflective mood!

Finishing touches of Red gloss being applied to the buffer beam.

A fine example of the ingenuity required to machine some locomotive components on normal machine tools when in the past the railway works had bespoke machines for this type of work. Seen here is the crosshead being set up for machining the white-metalled sliding surfaces that run on the slide bars so that they are square and true to the attached piston rod. The whole crosshead/piston rod assembly then has to be turned over to machine the other sliding face to complete. All heavy work.

Expansion links for the Stephenson’s valve gear fitted with the new die blocks and side plates complete ready side plates to be riveted on, then painting and installation.

Front end view, hand rails fitted with new cast smoke box number plate fitted – 4561 plate used for bolt trial fitting while correct 9351 plate is awaited.

An unusual view of the locomotive end of the tender that will run with 9351 when initially out shopped, not normally seen when in service and close-coupled to locomotive. The intermediate buffers are shown, their job is to keep the engine/tender coupling tight to reduce “surging” when the locomotive is pulling hard.The “modern” GWR tenders were interchangeable to a degree thus tender swaps are possible.

This tender needs more work before it’s ready to run.

 

Cylinder looking down the bore to the piston head. As everything is newly machined, everything has been coated with cylinder oil to help bed everything in.

 

 

 

 

New blower ring ready to fit on the bottom of the new chimney. The small holes are for the blower used to control the draw on the fire. The larger hole are for the exhaust steam from the vacuum ejector.

 

 

 

An unusual view of the smoke box arrangement before the chimney, blower ring and chimney bell is fitted. This shows the complete regulator to cylinder steam pipe layout with the pipe work into and out of the super heater header. Also in view is the regulator valve and the end of the regulator rod as the cover plate has yet to be installed.

 

 

The next three photos show the almost complete drivers side motion with connecting rod being set up to carry out the bump test. This is to check how much clearance there is at each end of the stroke between the piston head face and the covers. The slide bars are marked with a centre punch at each end the cross head travel, the connection rod is then taken down and the extra travel of the cross head past the centre dot shows the clearance at each end. Adjustments can then be made.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cab fittings almost complete, copper pipe work is annealed prior to fitting  to reduce the possibility of cracking in the future, then polished.

 

 

 

 

Brake adjustment turnbuckles, 4 new lock nuts have been made, 2 off with a left hand thread and 2 off with a normal right hand thread. These lock the turnbuckle and hold a captive sliding key in place. All part of the railway belt and braces approach to engineering design.

 

 

 

The new iron chimney casting, fresh from the foundry, awaiting machining for the mounting bolts and the attachment holes for the blower ring.The recess for the fitment of the spun copper chimney cap is shown.

West Somerset Railway supporters have shown their commitment to the Railway and determination not to be beaten by vandals by donating over £1,000 to repair the damage in less than 24 hours.

Vandals sadly struck the West Somerset Railway (WSR) on 29th April at around 9pm with an attack on a railway coach stabled overnight at Bishops Lydeard.  They smashed three large carriage windows and two door windows in the attack which it is estimated will cost £1,000 to replace and repair.  The attackers posted a video of the attack on social media which has been widely circulated and even broadcast on BBC TV’s local ‘Points West’ programme.

The WSRA, the Railway’s supporting charity, responded by launching a facebook fundraising campaign to raise the money for the repairs.  In less than 24 hours over £1,100 had been raised and the total now stands at £1,248 with more to come from the government ‘gift aid’ scheme which adds 25% to donations from UK tax payers.  The fundraising campaign was launched with the suggestion that 100 people gave £10 each, to achieve the required £1000.  To date, 76 people have donated and the value of the donations ranged from £4 to £100.  The social media campaign allowed everyone of whatever means to make a valuable contribution and reflects the inclusive nature of the West Somerset Railway.

WSR plc chairman Jonathan Jones-Pratt said:

“This attack was horrible for the Railway’s dedicated staff and volunteers who put in many hours maintaining our vintage vehicles to give visitors a taste of nostalgia on a trip to the seaside.  Local people have rallied round and helped identify the perpetrators.  We have passed our information to the Somerset Police and trust that swift action will be taken.”

WSRA chairman Paul Whitehouse said:

“It was so heartening to see how folk have responded positively to this mindless destructive act.  We have had hundreds of messages of support.  We are engaged on a refurbishment and repainting programme for the Railway’s carriages at our Williton works, and it costs around £5,000 to paint each coach.  If supporters would like to mark their displeasure at this act of vandalism and support for the Railway, the appeal remains open until the end of May and any donation would be most welcome.  It will be used to enhance the Railway’s carriages so that some good can come out of this episode.”

Facebook users can donate at https://www.facebook.com/donate/442896366465199/

Donations can also be made at https://www.justgiving.com/westsomersetrailwayassociation

PRESS RELEASE ENDS

For further comment please contact:

manager@wsra.org.uk

For information about the Railway:

paul.conibeare@wsrail.net

Photographs

Carriage with broken windows

 

 

 

 

 


A recently refurbished carriage